Thursday, 28 May 2009

LUCKY TATTIES IN THE 60'S

Made in Scotland, Lucky Tatties were a prized sweet for us kids back in the 60's. They were quite a size, solid white fondant covered in cinnamon powder. A bit more expensive than your average penny tray items, around threepence each, which meant you could be faced with a bit of a dilemma - do you buy 3 items from the penny tray or 1 Lucky Tattie?! What swayed the occasional Lucky Tattie purchase was that they had wee charms inside, usually a plastic animal or something like that, so they would be a long lasting sweet with a small reward for your efforts!
My local sweet shop/newsagent, Stan's, sold them back then but I doubt if you'll be able to find them in your corner shop nowadays. I don't know when shops stopped selling them, but I can't recall ever buying any in the 70's, or anytime after. The good news is that there are specialist shops on the net you can buy them from, although they don't make them with the charms anymore.

19 comments:

  1. Were they also called Tobermory Tatties.
    Would you be able to sell children sweets with hidden choking hazards hidden inside them these days. Saying that I can't remember the streets of Lochee littered with dead children with brown powder faces.

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  2. I rememeber as I was one of those dead children..I seem to remember chocking on a wee cowboy on a horse and then it all went dark.

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    1. Hahahaha - that's hilarious!!

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  3. I used to love these.Last night they were discussing them on Radio 2.
    I used to end up chewing the toys to bits.
    Many a Scots dentist got rich on treating the results of eating stuff like this.

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  4. i was the owner of many a headless commando too :)

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  5. The Sweetie Shop in the Keillor Centre had them the last time I was in, that was a while ago though!

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  6. i saw them in fortes cafe in stobswell dundee. the other day .

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  7. LUCKY TATTIES STILL HAVE A DUNDEE CONNECTION.
    THEY ARE MADE IN AYRSHIRE AT CANDYCO OF TROON, BY MYSELF, WHO LIVED, WORKED AND PLAYED RUGBY IN DUNDEE IN THE 1970'S. THEY WERE ALSO KNOWN AS TOBERMORY TATTIES AND PEEDIE TATTIES BUT NO LONGER CONTAIN THE LUCKY CHARM OR IN MY CASE FROM MEMORY A LUCKY ONE CONTAINED A PENNY (UNWRAPPED). THEY ARE NOT MADE WITH FONDANT AS SOMEONE SUGGESTED BUT WITH SUGAR AND GLUCOSE AND ALLOWED TO "GRAIN OFF" SIMILAR TO EDINBURGH ROCK. THEY WERE ORIGINALLY MADE BY BAKERS USING MARZIPAN AS THE BASE.

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  8. I used to luv lucky tatties. There's a drink called fireball which is Canadian whiskey and cinnamon and it reminds me of these-it tastes ace!

    From:borntoshop

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  9. Got one if these in rizza's in huntly yesterday . Had never heard of them before . Quite good

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  10. I remember them as Tobermory Tatties - used to love them in the 60s - probably because they were almost 100% sugar! Anyone got any ideas why they were called Tobermory Tatties as there seems to be little or no connection with Tobermory?

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  11. Hello, are you sure they were not made in the 50's as I can remember buyiny them before I went into the army in 1960 >>

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  12. I'd imagine Lucky Tatties were around for many years before the 60's, but Retro Dundee only covers the 60's to 80's period which is why they crop up as a memory from the 60's.

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  13. hello, just saw this, history of Lucky Tatties goes way back to the 1890's,s, but were made by wives/mums. Mainly for there miner family members. First iv heard of them was from Fife pits. The men used them as a fail safe.. if there was a cave in, a grown man could last 3 days on them. Theres a story from before then that the workers on the Forth rail bridge had them to.

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  14. I don't know but could it be that the fondant was actually macaroon? That as I discovered is mashed potato and condensed milk, probably with loads of sugar too. Hence the tattie?

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  15. During the 60s & 70s you could get fruit salads and black jacks for a farthing or 4 for a penny! Or we could have 'penny dainties' hard toffee made by McGowan. Too big and too hard to bite or chew and eat in one go, we used to break them on the edge of kerb stones to be able to eat them

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  16. The connection to Tobermory is that legend has it that a Spanish galleon sank in Tobermory Bay with treasure onboard. The "treasure" in lucky tatties is the wee toy or charm.

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  17. I remember finding half a battleship in one,don't know where the other half went.I was a hungry kid.they were very chewy..........

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  18. does anyone know how to make lucky tatties, its the white bit.. whats in it? i've got a massive craving for these!

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